Hawkins Watts New Zealand

Products
Acidulants
Antifoams
Antioxidants
Aromatics
Bulking Agents
Cocoa
Colours
Dehydrated Products
Emulsifiers
Flavours
Hydrocolloids
: Agar
: Alginate
: Carrageenan
: CMC
: Gelatine
: Guar Gum
: Gum Acacia
: Locust Bean Gum
: MCC
: Pectins
: Tara Gum
: Xanthan
Inclusions
Minerals
Nutraceuticals
Preservatives
Sweeteners
SMALL PACKS
Products - Hydrocolloids > Guar Gum
Application

Guar gum (E412) is used as a thickener in sauces, salad dressings, as a stabiliser in ice cream that prevents ice crystals from forming, and as a fat substitute that adds the "mouth feel" of fat.

In pastry fillings, it prevents "weeping" (syneresis) of the water in the filling, keeping the pastry crust crisp.
It has a very high viscosity (thickness) even when very little is used.

When mixed with xanthan gum or locust bean gum, the viscosity is more than when either one is used alone, so less of each can be used.

APPLICATION FUNCTION
Soups, sauces and marinades Viscosity control.
Pastry fillings Viscosity and syneresis control.
Ice Cream Ice crystal and Viscosity control. Fat mimetic.


Chemistry

Guar gum is a long-chain polysaccharideGuar gum (E412) is a polysaccharide (a long chain made of sugars) composed of galactose and mannose.

Guar gum comes from the endosperm of the seed of the legume Cyamopsis tetragonolobus, which is an annual plant grown in arid regions of India.

Properties

Guar gum is an economical thickener and stabiliser. It hydrates fairly rapidly in cold water to give highly viscous, pseudoplastic solutions of generally greater low-shear viscosity when compared with other hydrocolloids and much greater than that of locust bean gum. High concentrations (~ 1%) are very thixotropic but lower concentrations (~ 0.3%) are far less so.

Guar gum is more soluble than locust bean gum. Unlike locust bean gum, it does not form gels but does show good stability to freeze-thaw cycles. Guar gum shows high low-shear viscosity but is strongly shear-thinning. Being non-ionic, it is not affected by ionic concentration or pH but will degrade at pH extremes at temperature (e.g. pH 3 at 50°C). It shows viscosity synergy with xanthan gum. With casein, it becomes slightly thixotropic forming a biphasic system containing casein micelles.

When guar gum is dissolved in hot or cold water, it takes around 4 hours to reach maximum viscosity.

It is not advisable to use more than 0.4% w/w Guar gum in a formulation as it can give a “mealy” taste to the finished product.


Back to the top


Using Our Ingredients:

For more information on the use of Guar Gum in food applications, contact Hawkins Watts New Zealand.


The Hawkins Watts New Zealand Gum Selector
The Hawkins Watts New Zealand Gum Selector
To help determine which hydrocolloid/s are right for your application or product, use our unique Gum Selector.

How to Place an Order with Hawkins Watts New Zealand - CLICK HERE

Our Supply Partners:

For more information on Roeper, our supplier of Guar Gum, please click here.
Acidulants
Antifoams
Antioxidants
Aromatics
Bulking agents
Cocoa
Colours
Dehydrated products
Emulsifiers
Flavours
Hydrocolloids
Inclusions
Minerals
Nutraceuticals
Preservatives
Sweeteners
Bakery
Beverages
Confectionery
Dairy
Meat
Spreads, sauces, fruits
Technical Toolbox
Using Our Ingredients
Product Development Tools
Reference Literature
Useful Links
Quality Toolbox
Policies
Audits
HACCP-based FS Program
Product Documentation
Our People
Our Newsletter
Our Supply Partners Contact us
How to Place an Order
Request a Document
Request a Sample
Hawkins Watts New Zealand,
43 Maurice Road,
PO Box 12-347, Penrose,
Auckland 1642,
NEW ZEALAND.

P    +64 9 622 2720
F    +64 9 622 2725
E    sales@hawkinswatts.com
W   www.hawkinswatts.com
Copyright © Hawkins Watts Limited
Hawkins Watts New Zealand is the trading name of Hawkins Watts Limited
Legal statement & disclaimer | :
Design by FoodWorks